REVIEW / Warhammer Quest (PC)

 

Warhammer Quest is a modern solution for pen-and-paper (and dice) players who have been itching to experience the fantasy world in a gaming console. It was released for iOS devices in September of last year, and the PC version just launched a few days ago via Steam. Warhammer Quest’s developers, Rodeo Games and Twistplay, takes the beloved franchise and lore and packs it into a great turn-based, roleplaying/strategy game that only suffers a little on some in-game aspects.

 

 

Warhammer Quest jumps into the story of adventurers (two warriors, a wizard, and an archer) and their journey. Every single town that the adventurers venture to provides them with a multitudes of new quests, whether it be slaying giant spiders to rescuing someone from a dark dungeon. The quests immerse players deep into the Warhammer lore, explaining how giant spiders have inhibited the land and so forth.

 

The lore of the beloved franchise are all here.

The lore of the beloved franchise are all here.

 

Gameplay is separated into two main sections: dungeon crawling and world exploration. Dungeon crawling is imperative for the adventures to improve themselves. Killing the monsters in the dungeons will garner experience points and each successive battle will give the adventures an item (potions, food, weapons, armor, and sometimes useless junk) and some gold. Completing a dungeon will also potentially reward them with a rare item, most likely equipment.

 

Fighting battles need strategic thinking.

Fighting battles need strategic thinking.

 

The gameplay in the dungeon works like this: each adventurer takes a turn navigating through a map. The dungeon is always setup as map that needs to be uncovered, and each time an adventurer sets on an area, he/she can potentially trigger a battle. The battles are where most of the action comes in. The adventurers, depending on their classes, can move, attack, cast magic, use abilities and items. Every turn is switched from the adventurers to the monsters: a “warrior phase” and an “enemy phase.” Each adventurer has a set amount of moves, whether it is advancing, attacking, or using abilities. The goal is to kill all the enemies, not die (i.e., lose all wound points) and ultimately to be victorious. Thus, each battle requires a strategic mind: how to efficiently use the adventurers to quickly dispatch the enemies.

 

Exploring dungeons can be very slow.

Exploring dungeons can be very slow.

 

There are several annoyances players may find in the dungeon-crawling aspect of Warhammer Quest. The first is just the overall slowness of the dungeon crawling. While just exploring a dungeon, there is no way to select all the adventurers and move at the same time in a general direction; each adventurer must be picked one at a time to move. While it makes sense tactic-wise, it really slows down the pace of the game when it is not in battle mode. Another issue is the randomness of enemy encounters. Typically, encounters happen when exploring new parts of the map; however, there are chances that enemies may appear after the end of a turn. So sometimes, when already battling numerous monsters, more monsters may appear to quickly turn the tide not in the player’s favor.

 

Traveling to towns can sometimes trigger a random event that may be good or bad.

Traveling to towns can sometimes trigger a random event that may be good or bad.

 

Outside of dungeon crawling, Warhammer Quest really takes the elements of pen-and-paper role-playing games seriously. The adventurers’ statistics are dependent on their experience levels and equipped inventory. Each successive level progression gives the adventurers new abilities, depending on their classes, and improves their survivability in dungeons and sometimes in exploring the world. There is a randomness aspect when going into towns; when perusing what the town has to offer, like buying and selling items and visiting training grounds to level up, an event may happen to an adventurer. Sometimes it is good, and sometimes it is bad. It can vary from an adventurer taking up a small gig to earn some gold to getting very inebriated at the local tavern and giving himself/herself a temporary statistic decrease for one dungeon exploration.

 

Enemy encounters happen in two ways: exploring a new area of the dungeon or after ending a turn.

Enemy encounters happen in two ways: exploring a new area of the dungeon or after ending a turn.

 

Speaking of gold, in Warhammer Quest, gold is king. It is a commodity and integral part of the game. Gold is the currency to purchase items as well as to level the adventurers after earning enough experience. At first, it takes a little gold to level up characters, but it does take a lot of gold to level them up after the first initial levels. Better equipment at the marketplace also cost a considerable amount of gold. While earning gold can be done in numerous ways such as selling unwanted items and completing quests, it does not seem to be enough.

 

In-game purchases, like premium weapons, can really make battles in lower levels easy.

In-game purchases, like premium weapons, can really make battles in lower levels easy.

 

The answer to the problem are in-game purchases. Using real-world dollars, a player can essentially purchase more gold. Tiered in bundles, purchasing gold can ease up on the grinding aspect of the game. Players can also purchase premium characters and weapons that can also make the initial portion of the game easy.

Overall, this is a good addition to the Warhammer franchise. Its great attention to detail on the pen-and-paper fantasy world will surely appease Warhammer fans. Those who also seek a great strategic role-playing game will find this very challenging. The only caveat is whether players will cave in a purchase premium items and gold in order to progress easily to the final quest.

 

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: